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NASA Astronomy Picture of the Day:

What happens if you crash a spaceship into an asteroid? In the case of NASA's DART spaceship and the small asteroid Dimorphos, as happened last week, you get quite a plume. The goal of the planned impact was planetary protection -- to show that the path of an asteroid can be slightly altered, so that, if done right, a big space rock will miss the Earth. The high brightness of the plume, though, was unexpected by many, and what it means remains a topic of research. One possibility is that 170-meter wide Dimorphos is primarily a rubble pile asteroid and the collision dispersed some of the rubble in the pile. The featured time-lapse video covers about 20 minutes and was taken from the Les Makes Observatory on France's Reunion Island, off the southeast coast of southern Africa. One of many Earth-based observatories following the impact, the initial dot is primarily Dimorphos's larger companion: asteroid Didymos. Most recently, images show that the Didymos - Dimorphos system has developed comet-like tails. DART Impact on Dimorphos: Notable images submitted to APOD

I stuck out my foot,
reaching for the stair.
I missed the step,
for it was not there.
It should have been solid,
but now I'm in the air.
A thought entered my head,
find something soft,
to avoid being dead.
As luck would have it,
there was a large bush,
and I fell in the middle,
right on my tush..

A Comment by Loy

Your avatar
Loy • 10/04/2022 at 11:06PM • Like 1 Profile

Good humorous poem! Glad you clarified this is fiction 😊.

NASA Astronomy Picture of the Day:

The whole thing looks like an eagle. A closer look at the Eagle Nebula's center, however, shows the bright region is actually a window into the center of a larger dark shell of dust. Through this window, a brightly-lit workshop appears where a whole open cluster of stars is being formed. In this cavity tall pillars and round globules of dark dust and cold molecular gas remain where stars are still forming. Paradoxically, it is perhaps easier to appreciate this impressive factory of star formation by seeing it without its stars -- which have been digitally removed in the featured image. The Eagle emission nebula, tagged M16, lies about 6500 light years away, spans about 20 light-years, and is visible with binoculars toward the constellation of the Serpent (Serpens). Creating this picture involved over 22 hours of imaging and combining colors emitted specifically by hydrogen (red), and oxygen (blue).

Photo by Yannick Akar

NASA Astronomy Picture of the Day:

What mysteries might be solved by peering into this crystal ball? In this case, the ball is actually a moon of Jupiter, the crystals are ice, and the moon is not only dirty but cracked beyond repair. Nevertheless, speculation is rampant that oceans exist under Europa's fractured ice-plains that could support life. Europa, roughly the size of Earth's Moon, is pictured here in an image taken a few days ago when the Jupiter-orbiting robotic spacecraft Juno passed within 325 kilometers of its streaked and shifting surface. Underground oceans are thought likely because Europa undergoes global flexing due to its changing gravitational attraction with Jupiter during its slightly elliptical orbit, and this flexing heats the interior. Studying Juno's close-up images may further humanity's understanding not only of Europa and the early Solar System but also of the possibility that life exists elsewhere in the universe.

Chauncey Mitchell Depew (1834 – 1928) was an American lawyer, businessman, attorney and politician. He served for two terms as United States Senator from New York and was well know for his wit and as an orator and after dinner speaker. He did work for Cornelius Vanderbilt, as an attorney and as president of the New York Central Railroad System. Read more  

NASA Astronomy Picture of the Day:

What could shoot out a neutron star like a cannon ball? A supernova. About 10,000 years ago, the supernova that created the nebular remnant CTB 1 not only destroyed a massive star but blasted its newly formed neutron star core -- a pulsar -- out into the Milky Way Galaxy. The pulsar, spinning 8.7 times a second, was discovered using downloadable software Einstein@Home searching through data taken by NASA's orbiting Fermi Gamma-Ray Observatory. Traveling over 1,000 kilometers per second, the pulsar PSR J0002+6216 (J0002 for short) has already left the supernova remnant CTB 1, and is even fast enough to leave our Galaxy. Pictured, the trail of the pulsar is visible extending to the lower left of the supernova remnant. The featured image is a combination of radio images from the VLA and DRAO radio observatories, as well as data archived from NASA's orbiting IRAS infrared observatory. It is well known that supernovas can act as cannons, and even that pulsars can act as cannonb

Colors

Posted by MFish Profile 10/02/22 at 06:52AM Share Nature See more by MFish

Contrasting colors of
browns, yellows and reds,
spread through trees
with leaf covered beds.

A special time,
is in the Fall,
when Nature's beauty,
is seen by all.

Cold Winter's blasts,
will soon be aware,
as most tree branches
will only be bare.

A Comment by Loy

Your avatar
Loy • 10/03/2022 at 08:46PM • Like 1 Profile

Nice and timely poem

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