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The Mountains

Posted by MFish Profile 09/17/21 at 10:07PM Nature See more by MFish

The mountains puncture the sky,
snagging clouds as they pass.
The green-yellow of decidious trees,
changing colors before the
leaves fall to the ground.
A most wonderous time of the year,
when a trees skeletal remains,
rattle the brain and senses.
An old, natural disaster;
no flowers except the Aster.

How does a person
make life whole again?
Is it done by writing
in a book with a pen?
I'm writing the words,
which are entering my head,
without benefit of rules,
or a guide, in good stead.
Some words are strong,
like a good grade of steel,
while many words are weak,
with little writer's appeal.
I must decide, the words to use
is what would be ideal.
Here I remain, wasting time,
as I search for words,
which will fit into this rhyme.

NASA Astronomy Picture of the Day:

There has been a flash on Jupiter. A few days ago, several groups monitoring our Solar System's largest planet noticed a two-second long burst of light. Such flashes have been seen before, with the most famous being a series of impactor strikes in 1994. Then, fragments of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 struck Jupiter leaving dark patches that lasted for months. Since then, at least seven impacts have been recorded on Jupiter -- usually discovered by amateur astronomers. In the featured video, variations in the Earth's atmosphere cause Jupiter's image to shimmer when, suddenly, a bright flash appears just left of center. Io and its shadow are visible on the right. What hit Jupiter will likely never be known, but considering what we do know of the nearby Solar System, it was likely a piece of rock and ice -- perhaps the size of a bus -- that broke off long-ago from a passing comet or asteroid.

Video by T. Humbert, S. Barré, A. Desmougin & D. WalliangSociété Lorraine d'AstronomieAstroqueyras

New Bulbs

Posted by MFish Profile 09/17/21 at 05:47AM Gardening See more by MFish

Just received an e-mail from Brecks.
"Your bulbs are on the way."
Once again I got carried away and
ordered too many bulbs.
Now I just have to remember
where the old ones are located.
Shouldn't be a problem as I
use chicken wire, which I cut
to cover the bulbs. I know it
dissapoints the squirel helpers,
but it's the way it has to be.

Sit you here,
write down the word,
be it trite, simple
or just so absurd.
Your role is to write
words to paper.
Thoughts are elusive
and they will fly
away from you,
if you don't try
to capture them
when you can
or else you will become
a lost an lonely
wordless man.

Your avatar
Loy • 09/17/2021 at 09:24AM • Like 1 Profile

good poem and words of advice! I need your discipline...

Your avatar
MFish • 09/17/2021 at 11:42AM • Like Profile

Thank you. A funny story. I'll tell you at another time.

My beloved's
thoughts are gone.
Broken sentence,
which make no sense,
as the words spoken,
elude me now.
She woke me at a early hour,
asking me why her underwear,
was in our bed?
Did I have plans for its use
or was this just a drill to see,
if I would lose my grasp
on the contiued attack on my sanity?

NASA Astronomy Picture of the Day:

Fans of our fair planet might recognize the outlines of these cosmic clouds. On the left, bright emission outlined by dark, obscuring dust lanes seems to trace a continental shape, lending the popular name North America Nebula to the emission region cataloged as NGC 7000. To the right, just off the North America Nebula's east coast, is IC 5070, whose avian profile suggests the Pelican Nebula. The two bright nebulae are about 1,500 light-years away, part of the same large and complex star forming region, almost as nearby as the better-known Orion Nebula. At that distance, the 3 degree wide field of view would span 80 light-years. This careful cosmic portrait uses narrow band images combined to highlight the bright ionization fronts and the characteristic glow from atomic hydrogen, sulfur, and oxygen gas. These nebulae can be seen with binoculars from a dark location. Look northeast of bright star Deneb in the constellation Cygnus the Swan.

Photo by Andrew Klinger

Mediterranean-inspired baked salmon topped with fresh cucumbers, tomatoes, onions, olives, and feta. A healthy low-carb meal your family and friends will enjoy! . Click to read the recipe

NASA Astronomy Picture of the Day:

Where on Earth do cyclones go? Known as hurricanes when in the Atlantic Ocean and typhoons when in the Pacific, the featured map shows the path of all major storms from 1985 through 2005. The map shows graphically that cyclones usually occur over water, which makes sense since evaporating warm water gives them energy. The map also shows that cyclones never cross -- and rarely approach -- the Earth's equator, since the Coriolis effect goes to zero there, and cyclones need the Coriolis force to circulate. The Coriolis force also causes cyclone paths to arc away from the equator. Although long-term trends remain a topic of research, evidence indicates that hurricanes have become, on the average, more powerful in the North Atlantic over the past 30 years, and their power is projected to keep increasing. Follow APOD on Instagram in: English, Farsi, Indonesian, Persian, or Portuguese

When I write,
I feel fine.
When the words stop,
will I remain kind?
I don't know.
Why am I asking you?
I'll keep on searching,
for it's what I do.
There are so many words,
but I will only use a few.

Your avatar
Carl • 09/16/2021 at 02:38PM • Like 1 Profile

I always look forward to reading your writings

Your avatar
MFish • 09/16/2021 at 10:31PM • Like Profile

Thank you, Carl. My mind is cluttered with worry but on occasion something pops through. I appreciate your kind comments.

NASA Astronomy Picture of the Day:

Which way up Mount Sharp? In early September, the robotic rover Curiosity continued its ascent up the central peak of Gale Crater, searching for more clues about ancient water and further evidence that Mars could once have been capable of supporting life. On this recent Martian morning, before exploratory drilling, the rolling rover took this 360-degree panorama, in part to help Curiosity's human team back on Earth access the landscape and chart possible future routes. In the horizontally-compressed featured image, an amazing vista across Mars was captured, complete with layered hills, red rocky ground, gray drifting sand, and a dusty atmosphere. The hill just left of center has been dubbed Maria Gordon Notch in honor of a famous Scottish geologist. The current plan is to direct Curiosity to approach, study, and pass just to the right of Gordon Notch on its exploratory trek.

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