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NASA Astronomy Picture of the Day:

This pretty field of view spans over 2 degrees or 4 full moons on the sky, filled with stars toward the constellation Taurus, the Bull. Above and right of center in the frame you can spot the faint fuzzy reddish appearance of Messier 1 (M1), also known as the Crab Nebula. M1 is the first object in 18th century comet hunter Charles Messier's famous catalog of things which are definitely not comets. Made from image data captured this October 11, there is a comet in the picture though. Below center and left lies the faint greenish coma and dusty tail of periodic comet 67P Churyumov-Gerasimenko, also known as Rosetta's comet. In the 21st century, it became the final resting place of robots from planet Earth. Rosetta's comet is now returning to the inner solar system, sweeping toward its next perihelion or closest approach to the Sun, on November 2. Too faint to be seen by eye alone, the comet's next perigee or closest approach to Earth will be November 12.

Photo by Jose Mtanous

A fence line,
a straight line for most,
interrupted at times
with a fence post.
Barbed wire is tricky,
stretching, it tight,
attaching with wire
to steel fence post,
stuck in the ground.
Steel post are pounded
into the earth.
No hole digging,
in rocky ground.
The fence is completed
many feel it should
be electrified?
What do you think?

NASA Astronomy Picture of the Day:

Blown by fast winds from a hot, massive star, this cosmic bubble is huge. Cataloged as Sharpless 2-308 it lies some 5,000 light-years away toward the constellation of the Big Dog (Canis Major) and covers slightly more of the sky than a Full Moon. That corresponds to a diameter of 60 light-years at its estimated distance. The massive star that created the bubble, a Wolf-Rayet star, is the bright one near the center of the nebula. Wolf-Rayet stars have over 20 times the mass of the Sun and are thought to be in a brief, pre-supernova phase of massive star evolution. Fast winds from this Wolf-Rayet star create the bubble-shaped nebula as they sweep up slower moving material from an earlier phase of evolution. The windblown nebula has an age of about 70,000 years. Relatively faint emission captured by narrowband filters in the deep image is dominated by the glow of ionized oxygen atoms mapped to a blue hue. Presenting a mostly harmless outline, SH2-308 is also known as The Dolphin-head Nebula.

Photo by Nik Szymanek

You can make this Easy Pork Fried Rice any time of the year thanks to frozen vegetables. Add them straight from the freezer to your skillet.  Want to use frozen rice? That makes dinner even easier! - A little planning is required because of the pork. Click to read Nick Evans' recipe 

Forever

Posted by MFish Profile 10/20/21 at 11:20PM Life Stories See more by MFish

Forever is the morning.
Forever is the day,
where I will be
to greet you then,
welcoming you to see,
the beauty which lies within,
the innermost soul of thee.

Your avatar
Loy • 10/21/2021 at 06:06PM • Like Profile

beautiful poem...

Your avatar
MFish • 10/22/2021 at 11:22AM • Like Profile

Thank you, Loy

The Annual Enrollment Period is the time to review your current Medicare Health Insurance to make sure you are on the plan that has the best coverage for you. I represent six insurance companies and they each have a variety of options available, many that include new benefits for 2022. If you have not reviewed your current plan to assure it is meeting your needs, now is the time to do that. I have been in the health insurance industry for many years and I would be happy to answer your questions and /or help you evaluate your health insurance needs to make sure you are enrolled with a plan that makes the most sense for you. Please call Loy Suderman at 206-569-5415 to get the help you need.

NASA Astronomy Picture of the Day:

Why would this mission go out as far as Jupiter -- but then not visit Jupiter? Lucy's plan is to follow different leads about the origin of our Solar System than can be found at Jupiter -- where Juno now orbits. Jupiter is such a massive planet that its gravity captures numerous asteroids that orbit the Sun ahead of it -- and behind. These trojan asteroids formed all over our Solar System and some may have been trapped there for billions of years. Flying by these trojan asteroids enables studying them as fossils that likely hold unique clues about our early Solar System. Lucy, named after a famous fossil skeleton which was named after a famous song, is scheduled to visit eight asteroids from 2025 to 2033. Pictured, Lucy's launch was captured with reflection last week aboard a powerful Atlas V rocket from Cape Canaveral, Florida, USA.

Photo by John Kraus

Your avatar
Loy • 10/21/2021 at 06:07PM • Like Profile

Wow! incredible!

How Near

Posted by MFish Profile 10/19/21 at 11:28PM Other See more by MFish

How near the Earth?
How far the Sky?
Questions posed, over the years,
with physical numbers.
Is it now a clear answer?
Or must we question again?
To the end of the Earth
and travel some more,
to see the greenest of grass,
in a rain forest we see,
with echo's of bird sounds,
as we peruse dreams in our life,
while walking the byways,
crossing river and stream.
Climb mountains, with abandon,
meeting New World cultures,
unlike any we know.
Aren't all those events, important,
in this World so grand,
in a land of plenty,
with a forgotten man.

You're the man.
You're the best,
except for Adam,
who went West.
Adam West then
was an actor playing Batman.
These crazy words,
ring in my ear.
Join me now,
have a beer.
Off we go,
into the rain.
Help me here,
I can't explain,
why I write
out words.
Weird they are.
Are you sure
this is my car?
It is yours,
told you before.
Here you are,
asking for more.

Your avatar
MFish • 10/20/2021 at 11:19PM • Like Profile

WoW! Bombs away.

Your avatar
Alex • 10/21/2021 at 04:59PM • Like 1 Profile

Good one, you are the man!

Your avatar
MFish • 10/21/2021 at 05:01PM • Like Profile

Crazy writing. Let the mind wander and don't dwell on decorum. Thank you

Your avatar
MFish • 10/22/2021 at 11:21AM • Like Profile

Always good for me to know I can do that, Loy.

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Claire Weekes, a "trailblazing Australian doctor stared down professional resistance to revolutionize the way we treat anxiety. Along the way she became a best-selling author and one of the first self-help gurus."
" Her face, accept, float, let time pass method" was based on the biological understanding of how the body’s simple alarm system, the unconscious fight-or-flight system – which she called first fear – could be distressingly perpetuated by what she called “second fear” which kicked off a vicious “fear-adrenalin-fear cycle”, Read article

Judith Hoare is the author of "The Woman Who Cracked the Anxiety Code: the Extraordinary Life of Dr. Claire Weekes.

NASA Astronomy Picture of the Day:

Where did this big ball of stars come from? Palomar 6 is one of about 200 globular clusters of stars that survive in our Milky Way Galaxy. These spherical star-balls are older than our Sun as well as older than most stars that orbit in our galaxy's disk. Palomar 6 itself is estimated to be about 12.5 billion years old, so old that it is close to -- and so constrains -- the age of the entire universe. Containing about 500,000 stars, Palomar 6 lies about 25,000 light years away, but not very far from our galaxy's center. At that distance, this sharp image from the Hubble Space Telescope spans about 15 light-years. After much study including images from Hubble, a leading origin hypothesis is that Palomar 6 was created -- and survives today -- in the central bulge of stars that surround the Milky Way's center, not in the distant galactic halo where most other globular clusters are now found.

There are thoughts thrashing
around in my head,
scratching and clawing;
trying to get out
through the tips of my finger,
and movement of my hand.
Trying to reach the writer,
most literal, to understand,
what is happening to his mind,
at this time of his life,
with his life's company
a sick, Dementia laden, wife.

Your avatar
MFish • 10/22/2021 at 11:20AM • Like Profile

I know. Dragging my blanket.

NASA Astronomy Picture of the Day:

Why can we see the entire face of this Moon? When the Moon is in a crescent phase, only part of it appears directly illuminated by the Sun. The answer is earthshine, also known as earthlight and the da Vinci glow. The reason is that the rest of the Earth-facing Moon is slightly illuminated by sunlight first reflected from the Earth. Since the Earth appears near full phase from the Moon -- when the Moon appears as a slight crescent from the Earth -- earthshine is then near its brightest. Featured here in combined, consecutively-taken, HDR images taken earlier this month, a rising earthshine Moon was captured passing slowly near the planet Venus, the brightest spot near the image center. Just above Venus is the star Dschubba (catalogued as Delta Scorpii), while the red star on the far left is Antares. The celestial show is visible through scenic cloud decks. In the foreground are the lights from Palazzolo Acreide, a city with ancient historical roots in Sicily, Italy.

Photo by Dario Giannobile

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