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There is a myth we live with, the myth of finding the meaning of life — as if meaning were an undiscovered law of physics. But unlike the laws of physics — which predate us and will postdate us and made us — meaning only exists in this brief interlude of consciousness between chaos and chaos, the interlude we call life....... Read more 

Henry S. Haskins ( 1875 - 1957) was a stockbroker and man of letters. He author a book called "Cat's Cradle, Songs Grave and Gay" published in 1916. His aphorisms, were edited and published anonymously in 1940 as "Meditations in Wall Street by Albert Jay Nock. 

Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (1844 -1900) German philosopher, cultural critic, composer, poet, philologist, and a Latin and Greek scholar. 

Source: Closing words in a letter from Friedrich Nietzsche, age 19,  to his younger sister Elizabeth.

Thomas Woodrow Wilson (1856 – 1924) The 28th president of the United States from 1913 to 1921. A member of the Democratic Party, Wilson served as the president of Princeton University and as the governor of New Jersey before winning the 1912 presidential election. As President, Wilson changed the nation's economic policies and led the United States into World War I in 1917. He was the leading architect of the League of Nations, and his progressive stance on foreign policy came to be known as Wilsonianism. Read more

Georgia O'Keeffe (1887 – 1986) was one of the most significant artists of the 20th century. She was a modernist artist known for her paintings of enlarged flowers, New York skyscrapers, and New Mexico landscapes. O'Keeffe has been called the "Mother of American modernism". Read more

Charlie Chaplin (1889-1977) - Sir Charles Spencer Chaplin Jr. was an English comic actor, filmmaker, and composer who rose to fame in the era of silent film and became a worldwide icon through his screen persona, the Tramp..,. Read more

Henry David Thoreau (1817 - 1862).  American naturalist, philosopher, poet, and essayist. He is best known for his book "Walden" or "Life in the woods", a reflection upon simple living in natural surroundings, and his essay "Civil Disobedience" (originally published as "Resistance to Civil Government"), an argument for disobedience to an unjust state.

George Bernard Shaw (1856 – 1950), was an Irish playwright, critic, polemicist and political activist. His influence on Western theatre, culture and politics extended from the 1880s to his death and beyond. He wrote more than sixty plays, including major works such as Man and Superman (1902), Pygmalion (1913) and Saint Joan (1923). With a range incorporating both contemporary satire and historical allegory, Shaw became the leading dramatist of his generation, and in 1925 was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature. Read more

Anna Eleanor Roosevelt (1884 – 1962) She was an American political figure, diplomat, and activist. She served as the first lady of the United States from 1933 to 1945, during her husband President Franklin D. Roosevelt's four terms in office.  Roosevelt served as United States Delegate to the United Nations General Assembly from 1945 to 1952.

Konstantinos Dimitriadis,  (1931 - 2020)  Greek poet, novelist, literary critic and scholar. Born in Thessaloniki, he was better known by his pen name Dinos Christianopoulos. His extensive work, published between 1947 and 1988 includes  "Age of Lean Cows", "Biography", Strangers' Knees", "Indefensible Yearning", "Suburbs", "Outcasts of the World", "Essays", "The Sculpture of Modern Thessaloniki", "Verse from the Army and  "With Art and Passion" He was awarded the 2011 National Grand Prix for Literature, but refused to pick it up. Photo Credit 

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