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NASA Astronomy Picture of the Day:

What causes a blue band to cross the Moon during a lunar eclipse? The blue band is real but usually quite hard to see. The featured HDR image of last week's lunar eclipse, however -- taken from Yancheng, China -- has been digitally processed to equalize the Moon's brightness and exaggerate the colors. The gray color of the bottom right is the Moon's natural color, directly illuminated by sunlight. The upper left part of the Moon is not directly lit by the Sun since it is being eclipsed -- it in the Earth's shadow. It is faintly lit, though, by sunlight that has passed deep through Earth's atmosphere. This part of the Moon is red -- and called a blood Moon -- for the same reason that Earth's sunsets are red: because air scatters away more blue light than red. The unusual blue band is different -- its color is created by sunlight that has passed high through Earth's atmosphere, where red light is better absorbed by ozone than blue. A total eclipse of the Sun will occur this weekend but, unfortunately, totality be visible only near the Earth's South Pole. Almost Hyperspace: Random APOD Generator

Don't Ask Me

Posted by MFish Profile 11/30/21 at 10:56PM Humor See more by MFish

A dot,
a period,
a space in time.
An era,
a place in line.
A gap,
an opening,
a portal,
a gate to go,
an age,
a date,
an object to show.
A word,
a sentence,
a paragraph below,
a time,
a life, so low,
a love
as others
and those you know.

I walk the night,
my head hanging down.
I'm not saddened,
just watching my step,
avoiding the puddles,
small watering holes,
where darkness is rich
much like the air,
laden with hope,
for the here and now,
as I, alone,
trod this path
towards a destination,
I do not know,
spare me the talk.
Spare me, my Soul
and I will in turn,
let myself go.

Did you ever
walk a train track,
where you took
small, choppy steps
on the creosote ties?

Your avatar
Carl • 12/01/2021 at 09:03AM • Like Profile

I did. Still remember the feeling. Hadn't thought about it for a long time until now

Your avatar
MFish • 12/01/2021 at 11:58AM • Like Profile

Me also. I tried to vary the steps with a long one then short. We would walk the tracks to hunting or fishing spots. Both grandparents retired from the NorthernPacific, with grandma being a station manager. She really could make the telegraph sing when she was sending messages.

NASA Astronomy Picture of the Day:

What's that moving across the sky? A planet just a bit too faint to see with the unaided eye: Uranus. The gas giant out past Saturn was tracked earlier this month near opposition -- when it was closest to Earth and at its brightest. The featured video captured by the Bayfordbury Observatory in Hertfordshire, UK is a four-hour time-lapse showing Uranus with its four largest moons in tow: Titania, Oberon, Umbriel and Ariel. Uranus' apparent motion past background stars is really dominated by Earth's own orbital motion around our Sun. The cross seen centered on Uranus is called a diffraction spike and is caused by light diffracting around the four arms that hold one of the telescope's mirrors in place. The rotation of the diffraction spikes is not caused by the rotation of Uranus but, essentially, by the rotation of the Earth. During the next few months Uranus itself will be visible with binoculars, but, as always, to see its moons will require a telescope.

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