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NASA Astronomy Picture of the Day:

Where does space begin? For purposes of spaceflight some would say at the Karman line, currently defined as an altitude of 100 kilometers (60 miles). Others might place a line 80 kilometers (50 miles) above Earth's mean sea level. But there is no sharp physical boundary that marks the end of atmosphere and the beginning of space. In fact, the Karman line itself is near the transition between the upper mesophere and lower thermosphere. Night shining or noctilucent clouds are high-latitude summer apparitions formed at altitudes near the top of the mesophere, up to 80 kilometers or so, also known as polar mesopheric clouds. Auroral bands of the northern (and southern) lights caused by energetic particles exciting atoms in the thermosphere can extend above 80 kilometers to over 600 kilometers altitude. Taken from a cockpit while flying at an altitude of 10 kilometers (33,000 feet) in the realm of stratospheric aeronautics, this snapshot captures both noctilucent clouds and aurora borealis under a starry sky, looking toward planet Earth's horizon and the edge of space.

Photo by Ralf Rohner

NASA Astronomy Picture of the Day:

Sprawling emission nebulae IC 1396 and Sh2-129 mix glowing interstellar gas and dark dust clouds in this 10 degree wide field of view toward the northern constellation Cepheus the King. Energized by its bluish central star IC 1396 (left) is hundreds of light-years across and some 3,000 light-years distant. The nebula's intriguing dark shapes include a winding dark cloud popularly known as the Elephant's Trunk below and right of center. Tens of light-years long, it holds the raw raw material for star formation and is known to hide protostars within. Located a similar distance from planet Earth, the bright knots and swept back ridges of emission of Sh2-129 on the right suggest its popular name, the Flying Bat Nebula. Within the Flying Bat, the most recently recognized addition to this royal cosmic zoo is the faint bluish emission from Ou4, the Giant Squid nebula.

Photo by Patrick Hsieh

Does It Matter

Posted by MFishProfile 07/22/21 at 03:48PM Humor See more by MFish

Does it matter
when I miss writing
on a page, as my
hands are a tremble?
A volunteer movement,
what ever it means,
when your hand will shake
if your grip is loose.
A staccato of noise,
a rattling plate,
to see the movement,
of shimmy and shake.
Nothing to be concerned about
my Doctor states.
It's just a reaction,
so do not fear,
it will still be there
the following year.

NASA Astronomy Picture of the Day:

Point your telescope toward the high flying constellation Pegasus and you can find this expanse of Milky Way stars and distant galaxies. NGC 7814 is centered in the pretty field of view that would almost be covered by a full moon. NGC 7814 is sometimes called the Little Sombrero for its resemblance to the brighter more famous M104, the Sombrero Galaxy. Both Sombrero and Little Sombrero are spiral galaxies seen edge-on, and both have extensive halos and central bulges cut by a thin disk with thinner dust lanes in silhouette. In fact, NGC 7814 is some 40 million light-years away and an estimated 60,000 light-years across. That actually makes the Little Sombrero about the same physical size as its better known namesake, appearing smaller and fainter only because it is farther away. In this telescopic view from July 17, NGC 7814 is hosting a newly discovered supernova, dominant immediately to the left of the galaxy's core. Cataloged as SN 2021rhu, the stellar explosion has been identified as a Type Ia supernova, useful toward calibrating the distance scale of the universe.

Photo by CHART32 Team

A picnic table without pasta salad feels like something is missing. This Pasta and Bean Picnic Salad is a spin on classic pasta salad with a white beans, fresh summer vegetables, and a light vinaigrette. No mayo. Click the Image below to see Sheryl Julian's recipe on "Simply Recipes"

#salad

It Is 3 AM

Posted by MFishProfile 07/21/21 at 11:03PM Life Stories See more by MFish

It is 3 AM
and I've been up, almost an hour,
writing words, from my memory
and asking the question.
Who are you searching for?
Do you know my name
or where I live?
Must I accept you, once more?
If I leave now
will there be a big chance
to stay here with you,
in our life's final dance?

NASA Astronomy Picture of the Day:

What if you could see, separately, all the colors of the Ring? And of the surrounding stars? There's technology for that. The featured image shows the Ring Nebula (M57) and nearby stars through such technology: in this case, a prism-like diffraction grating. The Ring Nebula is seen only a few times because it emits light, primarily, in only a few colors. The two brightest emitted colors are hydrogen (red) and oxygen (blue), appearing as nearly overlapping images to the left of the image center. The image just to the right of center is the color-combined icon normally seen. Stars, on the other hand, emit most of their light in colors all across the visible spectrum. These colors, combined, make a nearly continuous streak -- which is why stars appear accompanied by multicolored bars. Breaking object light up into colors is scientifically useful because it can reveal the elements that compose that object, how fast that object is moving, and how distant that object is.

Would it be, I could fly
through the night air
and race through the clouds.
There is no freedom, when in a plane.
You are flying, but it isn't the same.
Become the magic, you say you are.
Fly to the Moon and be a star,
for it is your new destiny
and you are what you will see.

My Heart

Posted by MFishProfile 07/21/21 at 11:57AM Life Stories See more by MFish

My heart has been broken,
all of my words will say.
Shattered in pieces, quite small,
by someone I don't really know.
Why does it happen, here to me?
I'm far from the romantic
I was when very young.
A cold place, my Soul
is in now, near thee.
I do not understand why
nor will I still pretend
to know of my emotions
or when it all began.

Run

Posted by MFishProfile 07/20/21 at 11:09PM Life Stories See more by MFish

Run from the dark corners of your mind,
though you know there is no escape.
No place to hide or to flee the scene.
The future is bright, but not now,
a world for me, is no longer here.
Her bright future is gone, not to be found.
I will soon, "pack my bag", as I leave
and will think of you as I weep.
What a sad ending, to a beautiful life.
You were the best person, you are my wife.

NASA Astronomy Picture of the Day:

Thor not only has his own day (Thursday), but a helmet in the heavens.  Popularly called Thor's Helmet, NGC 2359 is a hat-shaped cosmic cloud with wing-like appendages. Heroically sized even for a Norse god, Thor's Helmet is about 30 light-years across. In fact, the cosmic head-covering is more like an interstellar bubble, blown with a fast wind from the bright, massive star near the bubble's center. Known as a Wolf-Rayet star, the central star is an extremely hot giant thought to be in a brief, pre-supernova stage of evolution. NGC 2359 is located about 15,000 light-years away toward the constellation of the Great Overdog. This remarkably sharp image is a mixed cocktail of data from broadband and narrowband filters, capturing not only natural looking stars but details of the nebula's filamentary structures. The star in the center of Thor's Helmet is expected to explode in a spectacular supernova sometime within the next few thousand years. Almost Hyperspace: Random APOD Generator

Photo by Bernard Miller

NASA Astronomy Picture of the Day:

The photographer had this shot in mind for some time. He knew that objects overhead are the brightest -- since their light is scattered the least by atmospheric air. He also that knew the core of our Milky Way Galaxy was just about straight up near midnight around this time of year in South Australia. Chasing his mental picture, he ventured deep inside the Kuipto Forest where tall radiata pines blocked out much of the sky -- but not in this clearing. There, through a window framed by trees, he captured his envisioned combination of local and distant nature. Sixteen exposures of both trees and the Milky Way Galaxy were recorded. Antares is the bright orange star to left of our Galaxy's central plane, while Alpha Centauri is the bright star just to the right of the image center. The direction toward our Galaxy's center is below Antares. Although in a few hours the Earth's rotation moved the Galactic plane up and to the left -- soon invisible behind the timber, his mental image was secured forever -- and is featured here. Follow APOD on Instagram in: English, Farsi, Indonesian, Persian, Portuguese or Taiwanese

Photo by Will Godward

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