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The fire had grown dim
from an old flame from the past.
A hungering inflection of the way
we were then. Another time,
another lost dream, has returned
to this life, no matter the cost.
It's not what it seems
for the love of another, has never
crossed this floor. A short stay here,
at least not any more.

NASA Astronomy Picture of the Day:

Light rays from accretion disks around a pair of orbiting supermassive black holes make their way through the warped space-time produced by extreme gravity in this stunning computer visualization. The simulated accretion disks have been given different false color schemes, red for the disk surrounding a 200-million-solar-mass black hole, and blue for the disk surrounding a 100-million-solar-mass black hole. That makes it easier to track the light sources, but the choice also reflects reality. Hotter gas gives off light closer to the blue end of the spectrum and material orbiting smaller black holes experiences stronger gravitational effects that produce higher temperatures. For these masses, both accretion disks would actually emit most of their light in the ultraviolet though. In the video, distorted secondary images of the blue black hole, which show the red black hole's view of its partner, can be found within the tangled skein of the red disk warped by the gravity of the blue black hole in the foreground. Because we're seeing red's view of blue while also seeing blue directly, the images allow us to see both sides of blue at the same time. Red and blue light originating from both black holes can be seen in the innermost ring of light, called the photon ring, near their event horizons. Astronomers expect that in the not-too-distant future they’ll be able to detect gravitational waves, ripples in space-time, produced when two supermassive black holes in a system much like the one simulated here spiral together and merge.

NASA Astronomy Picture of the Day:

Bright elliptical galaxy Messier 87 (M87) is home to the supermassive black hole captured by planet Earth's Event Horizon Telescope in the first ever image of a black hole. Giant of the Virgo galaxy cluster about 55 million light-years away, M87 is the large galaxy rendered in blue hues in this infrared image from the Spitzer Space telescope. Though M87 appears mostly featureless and cloud-like, the Spitzer image does record details of relativistic jets blasting from the galaxy's central region. Shown in the inset at top right, the jets themselves span thousands of light-years. The brighter jet seen on the right is approaching and close to our line of sight. Opposite, the shock created by the otherwise unseen receding jet lights up a fainter arc of material. Inset at bottom right, the historic black hole image is shown in context, at the center of giant galaxy and relativistic jets. Completely unresolved in the Spitzer image, the supermassive black hole surrounded by infalling material is the source of enormous energy driving the relativistic jets from the center of active galaxy M87.

Years Ago

Posted by MFishProfile 04/14/21 at 10:32PM Other See more by MFish

Years ago, when light was gray;
Before the dawn of a coming day.
I arose early to watch the Moon,
traverse the Sky, like a Loon.
An object with a shape of long
forgotten material, lay among
the branches of a Maple tree,
awaiting the love, escaping me.
Far away from the lonely abode,
upon Death's horse, he rode.

NASA Astronomy Picture of the Day:

This supernova shock wave plows through interstellar space at over 500,000 kilometers per hour. Near the middle and moving up in this sharply detailed color composite, thin, bright, braided filaments are actually long ripples in a cosmic sheet of glowing gas seen almost edge-on. Cataloged as NGC 2736, its elongated appearance suggests its popular name, the Pencil Nebula. The Pencil Nebula is about 5 light-years long and 800 light-years away, but represents only a small part of the Vela supernova remnant. The Vela remnant itself is around 100 light-years in diameter, the expanding debris cloud of a star that was seen to explode about 11,000 years ago. Initially, the shock wave was moving at millions of kilometers per hour but has slowed considerably, sweeping up surrounding interstellar material. In the featured narrow-band, wide field image, red and blue colors track, primarily, the characteristic glows of ionized hydrogen and oxygen atoms, respectively. Portal Universe: Random APOD Generator

Photo by Utkarsh Mishra

NASA Astronomy Picture of the Day:

How fast do elementary particles wobble? A surprising answer to this seemingly inconsequential question came out of Brookhaven National Laboratory in New York, USA in 2001, and indicated that the Standard Model of Particle Physics, adopted widely in physics, is incomplete. Specifically, the muon, a particle with similarities to a heavy electron, has had its relatively large wobble under scrutiny in a series of experiments known as g-2 (gee-minus-two). The Brookhaven result galvanized other experimental groups around the world to confirm it, and pressured theorists to better understand it. Reporting in last week, the most sensitive muon wobble experiment yet, conducted at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) in Illinois and pictured here, agreed with the Brookhaven result. The unexpected wobble rate may indicate that an ever-present sea of virtual particles includes types not currently known. Alternatively, it may indicate that flaws exist in difficult theoretical prediction calculations. Future runs at Fermilab's g-2 experiment will further increase precision and, possibly, the statistical difference between the universe we measure and the universe we understand.

Do not ponder,
Do not dwell.
My soul tells my body,
were on a slow ride to Hell.
I no longer have control
of my body or my mind.
It matters not
if the words are unkind.
Go from this place.
Go now and flee.
Keep hiding your face
from those who can't see,
the pain inside you,
from deep within,
who haven't a clue
of the pain you are in.

In another time,
so long ago,
we went to the movies.
Never went to the show.
The problem with movies;
there is no chance for romance.
So you drove to the Grange,
where people would dance.
There was "Square Dancing"
you moved around in a circle,
with a twirl or dosey do.
Off you would dance, not slow.
Later, the music scene, change it did,
when you could dance face
to face; "oh you kid."
A waltz, a two step, a Varsouviana.
You would have a young lady, by the hand.
Then new music burst onto the scene;
It was Rock and Roll. And then the King
Elvis Presley, Roy Orbison and
became the latest thing.

NASA Astronomy Picture of the Day:

What lights up the Flame Nebula? Fifteen hundred light years away towards the constellation of Orion lies a nebula which, from its glow and dark dust lanes, appears, on the left, like a billowing fire. But fire, the rapid acquisition of oxygen, is not what makes this Flame glow. Rather the bright star Alnitak, the easternmost star in the Belt of Orion visible on the far left, shines energetic light into the Flame that knocks electrons away from the great clouds of hydrogen gas that reside there. Much of the glow results when the electrons and ionized hydrogen recombine. The featured picture of the Flame Nebula (NGC 2024) was taken across three visible color bands with detail added by a long duration exposure taken in light emitted only by hydrogen. The Flame Nebula is part of the Orion Molecular Cloud Complex, a star-forming region that includes the famous Horsehead Nebula.

Photo by Team ARO

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