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A Mercury Transit Sequence

Posted by Specola Posted on 11/10/2019 at 12:16PM Photography See more by Specola

NASA Astronomy Picture of the Day:

Tomorrow -- Monday -- Mercury will cross the face of the Sun, as seen from Earth. Called a transit, the last time this happened was in 2016. Because the plane of Mercury's orbit is not exactly coincident with the plane of Earth's orbit, Mercury usually appears to pass over or under the Sun. The featured time-lapse sequence, superimposed on a single frame, was taken from a balcony in Belgium shows the entire transit of 2003 May 7. That solar crossing lasted over five hours, so that the above 23 images were taken roughly 15 minutes apart. The north pole of the Sun, the Earth's orbit, and Mercury's orbit, although all different, all occur in directions slightly above the left of the image. Near the center and on the far right, sunspots are visible. After Monday, the next transit of Mercury will occur in 2032. Watch: the November 11 Transit of Mercury from Earth or from Space.

Photo by Dominique Dierick

The burning bush of light and flame
Creates a need for me to explain.
It's not the fear from the bush ablaze,
But the lack of love, that does amaze.
Why all the hate in this World today,
When those that hate should go away.
Away from those different than thee
Letting the love of others be..

A new adventure, every day.
It's now time to put away
the clothes of this Summer past.
Bring out the Winter warmth
of turtleneck sweaters and of course
the heavy coats with scarves and mittens.
Rain boots and socks of wool
to keep your feet so very warm.
Let's not forget a nice warm hat
to keep the cold from ears and head.
Stay warm as Winter's near.

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Saturn the Giant

Posted by Specola Posted on 11/09/2019 at 12:15PM Photography See more by Specola

NASA Astronomy Picture of the Day:

On May 25, 1961 U.S. president John Kennedy announced the goal of landing astronauts on the Moon by the end of the decade. By November 9, 1967 this Saturn V rocket was ready for launch and the first full test of its capabilities on the Apollo 4 mission. Its development directed by rocket pioneer Wernher Von Braun, the three stage Saturn V stood over 36 stories tall. It had a cluster of five first stage engines fueled by liquid oxygen and kerosene which together were capable of producing 7.9 million pounds of thrust. Giant Saturn V rockets ultimately hurled nine Apollo missions to the Moon and back again with six landing on the lunar surface. The first landing mission, Apollo 11, achieved Kennedy's goal on July 20, 1969. Watch: the November 11 Transit of Mercury from Earth or from Space.

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NGC 3572 and the Southern Tadpoles

Posted by Specola Posted on 11/08/2019 at 12:16PM Photography See more by Specola

NASA Astronomy Picture of the Day:

This cosmic skyscape features glowing gas and dark dust clouds along side the young stars of NGC 3572. A beautiful emission nebula and star cluster in far southern skies, the region is often overlooked by astroimagers in favor of its brighter neighbor, the nearby Carina Nebula. Stars from NGC 3572 are toward the upper left in the telescopic frame that would measure about 100 light-years across at the cluster's estimated distant of 9,000 light-years. The visible interstellar gas and dust is part of the star cluster's natal molecular cloud. Dense streamers of material within the nebula, eroded by stellar winds and radiation, clearly trail away from the energetic young stars. They are likely sites of ongoing star formation with shapes reminiscent of the cosmic Tadpoles of IC 410 better known to northern skygazers. In the coming tens to hundreds of millions of years, gas and stars in the cluster will be dispersed though, by gravitational tides and by violent supernova explosions that end the short lives of the massive cluster stars.

Photo by Josep Drudis

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